Countdown to College: 21 'To Do' Lists for High School, by Valerie Pierce with Cheryl Rilly offers step-by-step strategies for ninth, tenth, eleventh and twelfth graders.

One section on scholarships suggests that what you and your family do, where they work and shop all point to scholarship money. Check out their profile and then create your own. Include aunts, uncles, grandparents, cousins, the companies they work for and organizations they belong to. Write down everything that makes you YOU.


The scholarship search websites speed up your research. Register with as many as possible and choose the broadest criteria for the most leads.

Where to start your scholarship search:

Libraries and bookstores. College Board Scholarship Handbook comes with a CD-ROM so you can view them via computer. Your high school's college and career center. They have scholarship books and may even have a scholarship database. Your counselor. Show her the profile you've written and she may be able to suggest more scholorship opportunities. Local businesses and organizations. Call and ask if they sponsor scholarships, awards or contests.