Oops. Retraction for last week's mess up. Crow, anyone?

To err is human. To forgive, divine.

Let me start by saying, please forgive me. In last week's column I featured a site called FelonSpy.com. A very astute reader was on the ball and clicked on the site's disclaimer link. Upon opening that page, she discovered their "disclaimer" was actually a collection of nonsense sayings like, "Do not pass go. Do not collect $100," and so on. All that worry about scary felons for nothing. I guess that is the good news here.

So let's blame my mother who sent me that email originally. I, like so many of you probably, trust most of what my mother sends me. No more! I vow to be more wary, more discerning and generally less trusting of all things digital.

That said, here's a site I KNOW is legit. I know, because this is where I confirmed the dear reader's suspicion about FelonSpy: www.snopes.com. And here is the link to the hoax itself -- http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/hoaxes/felonspy.asp.

What is Snopes? Here is Wikipedia's entry: Snopes, also known as the Urban Legends Reference Pages, is a website that is the best-known resource for validating and debunking urban legends, Internet rumors, e-mail forwards, and other such stories of uncertain or questionable origin in American popular culture. Snopes is run by Barbara and David Mikkelson, a California couple who met on the alt.folklore.urban newsgroup. The Mikkelsons also founded the San Fernando Valley Folklore Society, and were credited as the owners of the site until 2005. The site is organized according to topic and includes a message board where questionable stories and pictures may be posted.

And there ya have it. I will now always do some extra research on my Cool clix. Girl Scout promise. Now will someone please pass me the salt? This crow doesn't taste so good.