My daughter just turned 3 and got a brand new bicycle. My parents got her the Mack Daddy princess bike with all the really girly bells and whistles. I am not sure who was more excited when it was wheeled out at her birthday party: Mommy or Daughter, but I did hear both of us gasp.

My daughter just turned 3 and got a brand new bicycle. My parents got her the Mack Daddy princess bike with all the really girly bells and whistles. I am not sure who was more excited when it was wheeled out at her birthday party: Mommy or Daughter, but I did hear both of us gasp.
This bike is extremely pink and just about everything on it sparkles. I want this bike for my own, but unfortunately my ample backside brought on by bearing my child prevents a smackdown with her. I have learned to do what a true mother does: get my joy from watching her have all the fun.
A new bike brings with it the new helmet, the training wheels and the frayed nerves. Every sharp turn or abrupt stop sent my blood pressure into the stratosphere, to the point where I couldn't go along as Daddy taught her to ride. I stayed away until one evening when I started to feel guilty for staying behind and caught up to the training already in progress.
As my husband started to ask me a question, I watched in slow motion as my child tumbled face first off her bike and into the pavement. I wanted to run to her but I was frozen. Fortunately my husband was able to function and picked up our child, whose front teeth had gone through her bottom lip! Once I got her in the house and cleaned her up, I realized that she was going to be just fine, but I was not. I could have used a trip to the E.R that night.
Bike helmets really do work. In this case the helmet took the brunt of the damage and I am thankful, but now I want more protection. Knee, elbow and wrist pads won't cut it. If you see a little girl waddling around in a scaled-down version of one of those sumo wrestler inflatable body suits in which you can run into anything and bounce off unharmed, look for me. I should be somewhere very close by making sure she looks both ways before crossing the street.