My two boys love sleeping at a hotel. Correction: My two boys love going to a hotel. Sleeping's not that much of a priority for them.

My two boys love sleeping at a hotel. Correction: My two boys love going to a hotel. Sleeping's not that much of a priority for them. Sometimes to help them sleep, my husband and I hang out in the bathroom reading. It's not exactly what dream vacations are made of, but the kids have to sleep, right? Maintaining a good sleep schedule is hard when traveling with children. It's especially hard if the grown-ups don't want to go to bed at the same time. If you can afford it, book a suite, suggested LiLing Pang, CEO and editor of Trekaroo, a travel website geared to parents. A suite room can cost 50 percent to 100 percent more than a traditional room, but it could be money well spent, Pang said. "If you have young, young kids who go to bed really early or if you have a sensitive sleeper, it's really worth it," she said. Other options include staying in a condo or finding a hotel with some other sort of auxiliary space, Pang said. In nice weather, Pang suggests using a balcony or patio, which can provide an enjoyable spot for parents to hang out while their kids fall asleep. Some hotels have communal living spaces near their rooms where parents could go with a baby monitor, she said. My husband and I still have fond memories of a quaint old hotel in San Francisco that featured a closet just large enough to hold a travel crib. Our oldest - and at the time only - son snoozed peacefully in the closet, which meant we could stay up late without disturbing him. It's also helpful to keep children's bedtime routines while traveling, added Priya Shah, a Hilliard mother of three. She and her husband, Darshan, have been to India three times since the birth of their oldest son. She makes sure to pack the kids' favorite books and stuffed animals. "We still do the same routine - brush and then stories," she said. "Once they are tired, they go to sleep."