It takes more than a love of Legos to work at The LEGO Store, according to manager Aaron Duty. "You need a creative mind," he said. "We look for people who are very patient. There's a lot of memorization of sets."

It takes more than a love of Legos to work at The LEGO Store, according to manager Aaron Duty. "You need a creative mind," he said. "We look for people who are very patient. There's a lot of memorization of sets." The people who work at this store really seem to like kids. They don't even flinch when a youngster pays for an expensive toy with change. How do you manage to create that atmosphere? I don't hire clerks. I hire brick specialists. Being the right person for the job means you see the value in how much this set means to this child. He or she saved his pennies for this product that's going to make this child so happy. At 5 p.m. on the first Tuesday of every month, kids ages 6 to 14 are invited into the store to participate in the free Monthly Mini Model Build. Does it attract lots of kids? There's always a line. People should prepare for some wait time. It's a fun event. Kids get to take their piece home with them for free. Any tips on how to find bargains at the store? The "Pick a Brick" wall is one of the more popular things with our value-conscious customers. People who like to create their own ideas can select the exact piece they need. Kids also like the mini-figure station, where they can build three custom mini-figures for $9.99. Check the website, there's always in-store events. I saw some boxes with pink on them on the shelves. Is Lego trying to cater to girls a bit more? We have a new Lego theme. Lego Friends. It's a group of girls who are friends. The sets follow them through their daily interactions. Any Lego etiquette that brick makers should follow when shopping at the store? Be respectful of your fellow Lego builders. It can get very, very crowded in the store.

Photo by Eric Wagner